florals


Spring is here and our weather warmed up quickly to hearken all the flowers into bloom.  The garden beds are filled with daffodils and tulips, and the red bud trees have added their color too.  It’s a beautiful time to wonder at the multitude of colors that now surround us.

And on Mother’s Day, a special thank you to mothers everywhere.  Although my mother passed away four years ago, I still think of her everyday and appreciate all the lessons I learned from her.  Take a moment and thank those mothers that are near and dear to you.

 

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Easter and April mean spring.  Spring means warmth and colors.  Except when Mother Nature decides to put a white icing over the landscape.  I spent some time at the McNeely Conservatory yesterday morning photographing the spring flowers.  Outside the weather was cold and windy and snowing, but the conservatory was the perfect antidote to the weather.  I was surrounded by the smells of tulips and daffodils, hyacinths and magnolias.  In the bonsai section I found this lovely azalea.  Its diminutive structure seemed to mirror the snow-covered tree outside, while its brilliant colors were the opposite of the landscape beyond the window.

Soon the snow will melt, and soon it will be spring!  We enjoyed a quick vacation to Salt Lake City the past few days.  There were remnants of snow when we arrived, but the sun was warm and the temperatures climbed each day.  Being from snow-bound Minnesota, I was thrilled to see these lovely spring crocus –  fighting off the cold and the snow of winter, bravely blooming and reminding us that spring will conquer winter and we will be surrounded by color once again. Soon.

Winter can be cold, blowing, bitter, and rough.  But there is also a uniquely delicate side to this season.  The snow can fall quietly and softly, and it can alight on the most delicate of surfaces, gracing them with its white coating.  These bee balm seed heads seemed to cup and receive the snow as it came down, holding onto it in the center.  Without the weight of a wet snow, the stems stayed upright and beautiful – proud of their place in the winter wonderland around.

It’s summer today – hot, humid and muggy.  But in the shade in our backyard I got lost in some everyday petunias.  With their bright purple and white they add welcome color to the summer greens and yellows.  I began photographing the mass of petunias, but as I got in closer  I was captured by their fragile thin petals that blossom out from small stems of green.  Their stickiness and tiny hairs catch any small bugs that are near.  The blossoms  are short-lived and will be shriveled tomorrow and dry by the next, but they are a beautiful burst of color and joy when it’s their moment to shine.

We spent yesterday exploring the backroads and lakes of western Wisconsin.  It was a beautiful summer’s day and the countryside was verdantly green due to recent rains.  As we were traveling down a county road I saw a large field of yellow.  As I ventured out in the waist-tall grasses and flowers I realized the field was filled with wildflowers.  These prairie coneflowers were high above the others, and they swayed in the wind.  Scattered around them were ox-eye flowers and bee balm.  I was in the middle of a sea of color and beauty.  The bees were busy moving amongst the blossoms and the wind rustled the flowers enough to make they appear to be dancing across the field.  It was a true representation of summer in all her glory.

The heat of July has brought the summer flowers to bloom in our gardens.  The coneflowers, rudbeckia, and bee balm are filling the yard with color.  As I was watching the bees flit back and forth among the bee balm blossoms I looked more closely at the flower.  What I saw was a “Medusa” of flowers –  unkept and wild, throwing its scent into the air to attract the bees.  And yet, that wildness had a unique beauty all its own – nature in her glory, whether neat and tidy or unkept and original, all serving a purpose.

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