Spring has arrived in the northwoods of Wisconsin.  Driving along a county road we saw (and avoided) many turtles in the road and beside it.   We also saw the lupine blooming in certain areas.  It’s low to the ground and the light needs to be from the right angle to see it’s lovely colors, otherwise it blends in with the grass, dirt and sand.  We rounded a corner and I admired a large patch of lupines, noting that I needed to return to photograph it.  As I was studying the flowers I looked beyond them and saw something looking back at me.  On the edge of the woods, blending in with the shadows, was a black bear.  He looked at me and then ambled back into the woods.  Needless to say, when I returned the next day to photograph the lovely flowers I was very aware of my surroundings.  A slight rustle in the woods and I stopped to see who or what it was.  This time it wasn’t my friend the bear, but it was only a squirrel.

We ventured north this weekend to the shores of Lake Superior.  After a miserably cold and rainy week the weather cleared in perfect time for the weekend, and with little to no winds and mild temperatures it was a wonderful time to explore new areas.  We wandered the highways and county roads of northern Wisconsin and even went to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan.  After the wet and late spring we’ve had, the roadsides are now in full bloom.  We were first treated to the white daisies and orange hawk weed that were abundant throughout the central part of Wisconsin.  Then as we reached the south shore of Lake Superior and continued to the north in Bayfield County, the lupine were in their prime.  I had seen photos of the wild lupine in the Bayfield area before, but they appeared to be in a large garden area.  I was not prepared for the plethora of blooms that were gracing the sides of the highways.  This photo was taken along the side of Highway 13 just north of Washburn.  With their blue, purple, pink, and white spikes they were a treat to the eyes and a reminder of how much we appreciate the colors of spring that replace the white of our winter season.