The seasons move quickly from spring into summer and this year seems to have moved faster than normal.  Everything has turned to a beautiful bright green — the color of new growth, late spring, and early summer.  We’ve had enough rain to keep things fresh and the heat hasn’t set in yet.  This graceful fern was backlit in the garden, accentuating each leaf and its lovely color.  Its beauty was stunning, and I also know it will be fleeting as the green will become darker and not nearly as bright.  It’s a reminder to me to appreciate the season and the time we’re in now as it changes ever-so-quickly and what we see today will not be the same tomorrow.

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High heat and humidity can only last for so long.  Eventually the atmosphere needs to clear it all out.  As the sunshine disappeared, the air stilled and the clouds moved in.  There was just a line of light on the far shoreline, but the rest of the sky was filled with billowing clouds – grey and dark.  Their reflection in the eerie calm of the lake seemed ominous.  A few minutes later the rain started in big drops, the wind picked up, and the rain became steady giving us the much-needed moisture.

The temperature dropped down into the 30’s overnight.  When I woke in the morning, the sun was trying to break through the fog and steam that was coming up off the lake.  The air was quiet, without a breeze, but it was filled with the sound of birds –  blue jays, robins, woodpeckers, geese, ducks, and loons.  It was an early, chilly, and beautiful beginning to a sunny and warm day.

Spring is here and our weather warmed up quickly to hearken all the flowers into bloom.  The garden beds are filled with daffodils and tulips, and the red bud trees have added their color too.  It’s a beautiful time to wonder at the multitude of colors that now surround us.

And on Mother’s Day, a special thank you to mothers everywhere.  Although my mother passed away four years ago, I still think of her everyday and appreciate all the lessons I learned from her.  Take a moment and thank those mothers that are near and dear to you.

 

Spring arrived quickly in the past week.  There were hints of green showing up in the trees and the grass.  The ice moved off the lake and the open water was an invitation for geese, ducks, loons, eagles, and the people wanting to fish.  It was a flurry of activity all generated by the unofficial end of winter.  By early evening it was quiet and peaceful again.  A light rain shower had moved through the area, the sun was beginning to set, and the lake had calmed.  And as if to punctuate the end of a delightful spring day, a rainbow appeared in the sky and was reflected in the still of the water below.

The cusps of seasons and days can often hold tension and beauty.  We woke to the sound of thunder as a storm was starting to roll through, yet the eastern horizon held a hint of color.  As the rain started to come down, I could see the droplets hitting the open water.  Further out on the lake was the edge of the black ice that was starting to go out, and on the opposite shore was the white ice and snow that hadn’t thinned yet.  It was a wonderful experience – both visual and auditory.  The loons are back in the area, and  the geese, ducks, and swans were all contributing to the soundtrack.

In my own life there is a change too, as I retired from my corporate job and am transitioning to the adventures I’ve been looking forward to all these years.  I began this blog in January of 2009 with the purpose of sharing the beauty of my world and to give me the incentive to photograph each week.  And what an amazing journey it has been — so many sights, so many surprises, and so much to see!  My plan is to continue this blog however my posts may not be quite as consistent in timing.  I hope you will continue along with me and share in my upcoming adventures.

 

We are seeing the start of our spring thaw.  Warmer temps and bright sunshine have had a significant impact on our snow pack.  Slowly we are seeing brown lawns reappear and some garden beds have small green shoots near the ground.  The lakes have a much longer way to go before they are clear of ice.  Gradually the ice near the shoreline goes out, but still the lake has a good 12 inches of ice.  The snow on the surface has become mushy and uneven, and eventually will melt completely.  The silence of winter is also giving way to the sounds of spring.  When I walked out onto the lake I could actually hear the snow melting, and high overhead the Canada geese, the ducks, the swans, and the sandhill cranes were all calling and honking.